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Sibelius’ The Tempest


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Sibelius’ The Tempest

OREGON SYMPHONY

Saturday | Nov 23, 2019 | 7:30 PM
Sunday | Nov 24, 2019 | 2:00 PM
Monday | Nov 25, 2019 | 7:30 PM
Arlene Schnitzer Hall

1037 SW Broadway
Portland OR 97205

Jean Sibelius, 1913

Jean Sibelius, 1913

Sibelius’ The Tempest

“Shakespeare and Sibelius, these two geniuses, have found each other,” commented one reviewer at the 1926 premiere of Shakespeare’s The Tempest with incidental music by Finland’s national hero, Jean Sibelius. Acclaimed stage director Mary Birnbaum, whose direction of Bluebeard’s Castle stunned audiences in 2016, returns to bring this iconic tale of magic and betrayal to life in a live dramatic production. Classical Series Concert

Carlos Kalmar, conductor
Mary Birnbaum, stage director
PSU Chamber Choir
Cast,
 TBA

Sibelius: The Tempest


Jean Sibelius

Jean Sibelius (/sɪˈbeɪliəs/;Swedish pronunciation, born Johan Julius Christian Sibelius (8 December 1865 – 20 September 1957), was a Finnish composer and violinist of the late Romantic and early-modern periods. He is widely recognized as his country's greatest composer and, through his music, is often credited with having helped Finland to develop a national identity during its struggle for independence from Russia.

The core of his oeuvre is his set of seven symphonies, which, like his other major works, are regularly performed and recorded in his home country and internationally. His other best-known compositions are Finlandia, the Karelia SuiteValse triste, the Violin Concerto, the choral symphony Kullervo, and The Swan of Tuonela (from the Lemminkäinen Suite). Other works include pieces inspired by nature, Nordic mythology, and the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala, over a hundred songs for voice and piano, incidental music for numerous plays, the opera Jungfrun i tornet (The Maiden in the Tower), chamber music, piano music, Masonic ritual music, and 21 publications of choral music.

Sibelius composed prolifically until the mid-1920s, but after completing his Seventh Symphony (1924), the incidental music for The Tempest (1926) and the tone poem Tapiola (1926), he stopped producing major works in his last thirty years, a stunning and perplexing decline commonly referred to as "The Silence of Järvenpää", the location of his home. Although he is reputed to have stopped composing, he attempted to continue writing, including abortive efforts on an eighth symphony. In later life, he wrote Masonic music and re-edited some earlier works while retaining an active but not always favourable interest in new developments in music.

The Finnish 100 mark note featured his image until 2002, when the euro was adopted. Since 2011, Finland has celebrated a Flag Day on 8 December, the composer's birthday, also known as the "Day of Finnish Music". In 2015, the 150th anniversary of the composer's birth, a number of special concerts and events were held, especially in the city of Helsinki.

Later Event: November 24
Edgar Meyer: Solitary Bass